How an Entrepreneur Can Use Momentum to Achieve Their Goals

by Denise J. Hart Mindset Mojo - preoccupation with perfectionism is the pathway to experience s...

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by Denise J. Hart

Mindset Mojo - preoccupation with perfectionism is the pathway to experience shame, while embracing process is a full time journey to building courage and confidence.

Momentum is one of my most favorite words. Back in high school, when I played basketball and ran track, my coaches would frequently weave the word momentum into their strategy talks with the team. It's true, that momentum means to be in motion and to have the strength of forward movement, but my former coaches also helped me to understand that momentum also has the connotation of being an advantage. Once you gain momentum, and this powerful energy is flowing in your direction, many people believe that the person that has momentum has an advantage that others do not.

This is especially true for entrepreneurs. Being an entrepreneur is all about taking calculated strategic risks to build momentum that grow your business exponentially. That's what I want to help you with today, getting intimate with momentum and understanding how to maintain it and use it to your advantage once you've got it.

The biggest inhibitor to maintaining momentum is what I call preoccupation with perfectionism. Many business owners are immobilized by perfectionist thinking which causes them to believe that there's only one way to do something or to "get it right," when what any entrepreneur should be focusing their energy on is to perpetually practice "process thinking." For 14 years I've taught a course at Howard University called Creativity in Life and Theatre. The method I'm sharing with you here in this article has helped many people to shift from the immobilization of perfectionist thinking to the power, fluidity and profits at the heart of process thinking.

It has been my experience in both the classroom and working with coaching clients that many people avoid process thinking because it's the 20 pound weight that gets you the real results you desire, while perfectionist thinking is the 2 pound weight that fools you into believing that you're doing something of value but there's really no chance for high benefit return.

Here's a secret to help you maintain the advantage of momentum that's found in process thinking,

The 6 P's of Process Thinking:

  1. Possibility-minded - believe that something (whatever you want to do) is possible
  2. Populate - to provide a multitude of ideas through your thoughts or the thoughts of others
  3. Probe - to explore and investigate the ideas for connection, resolution, or moving you forward to refine and explore more ideas
  4. Patience - remain steadfast despite opposition, difficulty, or adversity
  5. Passion - have/maintain/re-connect to a strong liking or desire for or devotion to your activity, object, or concept
  6. Plan - gathering information from the process, define your method to achieve your end goal

Process thinking is a gift every entrepreneur should be giving themselves on a daily basis. It's this kind of thinking that gives you the power and the permission to explore and create strategic self talk that says: stay open, let's do, let's see, let's figure it out. It's this kind of shift in your thinking that will open the doors of creativity and innovation and quite possibly you'll find that you no longer leave money on the table and begin to use your momentum to attract and to achieve your goals.


A Discussion on Business and Brown Girl Beauty with the Creator of My BrownBox

Denise J. Hart, The Motivated Mindset Coach, is committed to helping women design their “Don’t Quit” attitude and KICK fear to the curb. She’s a member of world renowned speaker and transformation coach, Lisa Nichols’ Global Leaders team and author of the forthcoming book, “Your Daily Mindset Mojo – 365 power thoughts to help you change your mindset and transform your life!” Get your free daily mindset mojo inspiration at

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