7-Year-Old Wins $16K for Her Original Comic Book About Afro-Puffed Superhero

by Shonette Reed Beating out more than 530 entries, 7-year-old Natalie McGriff, co-creator of The Adventures of Moxie Girl comic book, ...


by Shonette Reed


Beating out more than 530 entries, 7-year-old Natalie McGriff, co-creator of The Adventures of Moxie Girl comic book, walked away with over $16,000 at One Spark, a crowdfunding festival in Jacksonville, FL.

After dealing with her own self-esteem issues because of the texture of her hair, McGriff’s mother, Angela Nixon, helped McGriff create The Adventures of Moxie Girl. The 7-year-old co-author hoped that the comic would empower young girls like herself who lack representation in the mainstream media.

The comic book introduces readers into a world where a young girl who hates her typical afro-puff hairstyle begins to take pride in her hair after her grandmother leaves her a shampoo that turns her puffs into magical, super-fighting Afro-Puffs.


With these magical Afro-Puffs, Moxie Girl is able to fight off monsters who attempt to eat library books—embracing hair texture and fighting for literacy all at once.

To combat the young author’s hatred of the texture of her hair and reading, McGriff’s mother decided to help her daughter write the book. This experience caused McGriff to gain better self-esteem and confidence, as well as fostered a new appreciation for reading.

Photo: WBLS
"I decided to help Natalie write this book because she was having self-esteem issues regarding her hair and she hated to read," Nixon said in a statement with the New Pittsburgh Courier. "She now realizes how powerful and awesome her hair is and that in order for her to write a cool book, she needs to read more books and learn different words."

One Spark, a crowdfunding festival, gains its prize money from entrance fees. Then users vote to determine how the money should be dispersed.

This allowed McGriff to walk out with $16,423.69 for her comic book.

The 7-year-old author won by 3 votes, allowing for more representation for young girls like her to spring up in mainstream media.

Though the journey was long and tough, Moxie Girl prevailed, showing that black girls do in fact rock, no matter what age.

Photo credit: Angela Nixon

Shonette Reed is regular contributor for Coloures and For Harriet from Los Angeles, Calif. With plans to break into the fashion industry as a fashion reporter, she runs her own style blog. Her aim is to highlight the important contributions of women of color in the fashion industry as well as give women of color more exposure within the leading magazines in fashion. You can follow her on Twitter: @ShonetteReed.

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